Fantasy Football Week 1 Starts, Sits, Sleepers and Risks for every game on the NFL schedule

Need Fantasy Football lineup advice? Talk to CBS Sports on your Google Assistant to get insights on the best sleepers and to help decide between players. Just start with, “Hey Google, talk to CBS Sports.”

Looking for some lineup advice? You’ve come to the right place. First, use Dave Richard’s Cheat Sheets — there’s one for PPR right here, and another for Non-PPR here — and then go through every game on the schedule right here to find out who Dave is starting and sitting for all 32 teams.

Falcons at Eagles

Sneaky Sleeper


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We know Philadelphia is thin on receivers with Alshon Jeffery and Mack Hollins hobbled. The only pass catcher who could reap with a favorable matchup is tight end Dallas Goedert. The 6-foot-5 rookie should find considerable playing time thanks to the size advantage he’ll give Nick Foles. Following a solid preseason (five-plus targets per game with nine catches for 149 yards and a touchdown), Goedert’s presence could put the Falcons in a bind since they’d not only have to cover him but also Zach Ertz, who is also 6-foot-5. Goedert isn’t refined as a route-runner and doesn’t have great speed but can be a big problem (pun intended) in the red zone and should get a lot of playing time. As streaming tight ends in Week 1 go, he’s ahead of Austin Seferian-Jenkins, Benjamin Watson, Ricky Seals-Jones or a Bucs tight end.

Risky Starter



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In four career games against Jim Schwartz-coached defenses, Matt Ryan has had multiple passing touchdowns once (2012 against a bad Lions team). This includes Ryan’s last two games against the Eagles where Schwartz schemed to not only stymie Ryan but also limit the Falcons run game. Philadelphia’s pass rush is also improved and should be in Ryan’s face frequently. If you didn’t draft Ryan to be your starter, don’t change your plan now. If you did draft Ryan to be your starter, consider Andy Dalton off waivers.

Risky Starter



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Agholor’s never been good against Atlanta (24 yards or less in three career games including last year’s playoff game) but that’s not the reason to get nervous about starting him. In six games with Nick Foles last year, Agholor caught 29 passes for 272 yards and one touchdown with four or fewer targets in half of the games. Most of Agholor’s touchdowns came against man coverage last year and several involved Carson Wentz biding time for him to burn downfield. Foles isn’t quite as adept, and the Falcons pass rush won’t let him sit back. With the hunch that the Eagles will primarily keep Agholor in the slot and not move him around too much despite their lack of receiver depth, Agholor seems a little too risky.

Bills at Ravens

Sneaky Sleeper



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Maybe you drafted him as a speculative receiver you’d only use when the matchup is right. This should be one of those weeks. Brown has looked great since training camp began and gives Joe Flacco a new deep-ball threat. His speed could bust the Bills’ zone coverage once or twice, especially if he finds himself in coverage against Vontae Davis, who allowed a deep touchdown to John Ross this preseason. But Brown also has a knack for doing well inside the red zone as 11 of his 17 career touchdowns have come from 20 yards or closer. If you need a spark at receiver, perhaps as a No. 3 option, give Brown a look.

Jaguars at Giants

Start Him in PPR



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It’s risky business starting any Jaguars receiver, but Cole should draw the best matchup among them against the Giants. While Big Blue has Janoris Jenkins and Eli Apple as outside corners, they’ll go with B.W. Webb as their slot guy. That’s an exploitable matchup for Blake Bortles to attack. Cole proved last season he’s able to extend short plays with his speed and could do the same here. I have him aggressively ranked ahead of Doug Baldwin, Robby Anderson and Randall Cobb in PPR leagues.

Sit Him



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Last year the Jaguars did a good job keeping premier tight ends from putting up big numbers. Only five tight ends scored on them, and most of them were by unheralded backups. Their defense is mostly unchanged, so expect the Jaguars to lean on their safeties to match up with Engram in the red zone and their linebackers to do most of the covering from everywhere else. It wouldn’t be surprising to see Engram play a little tentatively in his first game after suffering a concussion. It would be surprising if he blew up for a big game against this defense.

Buccaneers at Saints

Start Him



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The Saints finished last season allowing at least one score to a running back in seven straight matchups. That includes a Week 17 showdown with Barber, who totaled 89 yards and a score on 19 touches. New Orleans added linebacker Demario Davis and will get back lineman Alex Okafor to help better contain the ground game, but Barber was really impressive this August and should be given plenty of opportunities to test New Orleans’ defensive front. Clearly the Buccaneers’ best running back, he should benefit from an improved offensive line and even a split of the passing downs work with Tampa’s other backs. Barber had 15-plus touches in four of his past five overall and should see at least that many on Sunday with all goal-line opportunities. I’d gladly use him ahead of Chris Carson, Jay Ajayi, Marshawn Lynch and Adrian Peterson.

Titans at Dolphins

Sneaky Sleeper



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No doubt about it, starting Davis means taking a leap of faith in Week 1. Including the playoffs he had just two games out of 13 last season that equated to nine-plus Fantasy points, and we didn’t see him make as much as a reception in a preseason game. But the 6-foot-3, 209-pound receiver stood out in practices, including in joint workouts with the Buccaneers. Tennessee changed its offense and will move Davis all over the formation looking for matchups to exploit. Miami has a number of underrated, tall cornerbacks who will see a lot of Davis on Sunday, but it’s not quite enough to sway Fantasy owners from trying Davis. He’s much better as a third receiver or flex than as a No. 2.

Start Him in PPR



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Lewis’ injury history made him a risky choice on Draft Day, but he’s healthy and available for Week 1, and I suspect the Titans will find unique ways to use him. It’s not so much that the matchup is great for him — he’s had mixed production against Miami going back to his days with the Patriots and the Dolphins weren’t bad at all against pass-catching running backs. It’s simply the assumption that Lewis will make a few plays as a receiver, pick up a handful of carries and help deliver north of 11 Fantasy points in full PPR leagues. He’s more of a low-end flex in non-PPR.

Start Him



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We’ve surmised all summer that Stills is the Dolphins’ best receiver heading into 2018. The toughest matchup he’ll have on Sunday would be going man-to-man with Adoreé Jackson, who has the speed to run with him, but even that wouldn’t be so bad because Jackson allowed seven touchdowns last year. Jackson is far from guaranteed to shadow Stills anyway — that’s good. And you might be worried about Ryan Tannehill throwing, but nine of Stills’ 18 scores with the Dolphins have come from Tannehill — and that number would obviously be higher if Tannehill played last season. The upside here makes Stills a No. 2 Fantasy receiver with a better outlook than Amari Cooper and Marquise Goodwin.

Bengals at Colts

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This is the perfect matchup for Eifert to begin his season. Indianapolis will use players like Clayton Geathers and Najee Goode to try to contain the 6-foot-6 Eifert. With Andy Dalton happy to have his big red-zone buddy back, expect him to focus on this specific matchup to help build a lead. It also bears repeating: Eifert has 20 touchdowns in 39 regular-season games, so he pretty much has a 50-50 shot to score each week. This matchup should make that probability more like 60-40.

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The Colts pass rush is weak and their secondary inexperienced. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see Dalton have an efficient, if not incredible, game to kick off 2018. Eifert’s healthy, John Ross’ speed will give Dalton a fresh dimension to utilize and A.J. Green should keep doing great things. It sure doesn’t hurt that Dalton had a clean 243-yard, two-score game versus Indy last season without Eifert (and Ross had one target). If you drafted Carson Wentz, Patrick Mahomes, Jimmy Garoppolo or even Russell Wilson and want an alternative, use Dalton just for this week — then feed him back to waivers when he plays the Ravens in Week 2.

Start Them



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After T.Y. Hilton, who is the second-best target for Andrew Luck? On a weekly basis, one of these two should be it. Ebron profiles as more of a receiver, but Doyle has great hands and is a huge target near the line of scrimmage. More importantly, Frank Reich helped curate an offense in Philly that routinely used two tight ends — one who would work downfield and another who could also block. Count on the Colts using both of these tight ends quite a bit, if only because they don’t have the receivers to make plays and because they’ll play from behind a bunch. Cincinnati’s starting safeties are a potential matchup target for Luck. Ebron has more upside of the two, but both can be considered usable starters in Week 1.

Steelers at Browns

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As of this writing, Le’Veon Bell hasn’t signed his franchise tender from the Steelers. That would make James Conner the Steelers’ starting running back against the Browns. Conner is a pretty good back — he averaged 5.3 yards per carry and 8.7 yards per catch this preseason and 4.5 yards per rush in 2017. He might lose a few touches here and there to Jaylen Samuels, but Conner should get his hands on the ball at least 15 times. He won’t produce like Le’Veon but he sure will serve as at least a No. 2 running back. His matchups get better in Weeks 2 and 3, so if you have him, hope Bell stays away.

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Can Vince Williams be the run-stopper Ryan Shazier was? He couldn’t put the Steelers defense back toward the top of the run defense mountain last season — 10 of the 16 rushing touchdowns allowed to backs came after Shazier’s injury. Now Williams will man the middle of the defense with journeyman Jon Bostic, keeping the concerns about stopping the run rolling into 2018. The Browns’ interior offensive line remains strong and they upgraded their run game by adding Hyde. He meshed successfully with the offense this preseason and even told CBSSports.com that the scheme fits him better than previous offenses he was in. It would be an upset if Hyde laid an egg in his Cleveland debut. I’d put him ahead of Jay Ajayi, Lamar Miller, Marshawn Lynch and any 49ers running back.

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Until further notice, Njoku is a touchdown-or-bust tight end, but the Steelers secondary has so many questions that it wouldn’t be wrong to trust Njoku to come down for six. Last year Pittsburgh used Ryan Shazier and William Gay to help cover tight ends, but they’re not on the active roster. Now those chores could fall on Jon Bostic, Morgan Burnett or rookie Terrell Edmunds. It puts a target on the Pittsburgh defense, a unit that allowed 52 yards and a touchdown to a tight end from Tyrod Taylor in his only game against them in 2016 (same defensive scheme).

Texans at Patriots

Risky Starter



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We know Miller looked slimmer and quicker this preseason, but a lousy track record against the Patriots makes him a dicey proposition. He’s averaged 18 carries and three catches over his three games against the Patriots as a member of the Texans and he’s failed to exceed 10 Fantasy points (14 in PPR) in any of them. You can even take it back to his past eight games against Bill Belichick’s crew and he’s still failed to rack up double digits even with a good workload. For what it’s worth, New England’s run defense looked much improved this preseason thanks to the bigger bodies they added this offseason. Miller is barely in the RB2 conversation this week.

Risky Starter



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This is a frustrating case of a good running back sunk deep within a committee against a strong defensive team. The Texans’ front seven is at full strength after missing several key players last season. Last year it held the Pats’ backs to 76 total yards on 23 touches (Burkhead didn’t play), but in the 2016 playoffs (pre-Burkhead) the Pats’ rushers tallied three touchdowns and 114 collective yards on Houston. The larger issue involves just how many touches Burkhead will get — the Pats can use Jeremy Hill at the goal line as well as to kill the clock, and James White will at least work as the passing downs back. Burkhead had 10-plus carries three times last season and 15-plus touches twice. He also averaged over 4.0 yards per game three times all season. Seems unlikely he’ll see even more work. Better to take a wait-and-see approach with Burkhead if you can.

49ers at Vikings

Sit Him



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Goodwin will have s