Wednesday, December 19, 2018
Blog Page 3

Donald Trump’s Michael Flynn-sized blind spot was just exposed again

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

Donald Trump’s Michael Flynn-sized blind spot was just exposed again

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

Article source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/12/18/politics/donald-trump-michael-flynn-sentencing/index.html

Useful Links: Swiss Watches | Watch Coupons | Coupons | Alu Foam | Security Rooms | Oldtimer | Bitcoin News

Penny Marshall, co-star of ‘Laverne & Shirley’ and director of ‘A League of Their Own,’ dead at 75

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

White House suggests it could back down on $5 billion border wall demand

<!– –>

CNBC logologo



Trump reportedly agrees to dissolve foundation, signals willingness to avoid government shutdown


The White House suggested Tuesday that President Donald Trump could back down from his demand for $5 billion to fund his proposed border wall in a year-end spending bill.

Trump’s push for the money has threatened a partial government shutdown when funding for seven agencies lapses after midnight Friday. Last week, the president said he would be “proud” to close parts of the government over border security.

“We have other ways that we can get to that $5 billion that we’ll work with Congress,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told Fox News on Tuesday morning. She added that the Trump administration could support $1.6 billion in border security funding proposed by Senate Democrats, as long as it can “couple that with other funding resources” to get to $5 billion.

WATCH: These virtual walls could be the cheaper and more effective alternative to Trump’s $5 billion border wall





She added that “at the end of the day, we don’t want to shut down the government. We want to shut down the border.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have cast the potential lapse in funding as the “Trump shutdown.” When Pelosi goaded Trump into an Oval Office fracas last week, the characterization appeared to irritate the president.

Sanders’ comments mark a de-escalation in the White House’s rhetoric on the proposed barrier on the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump has repeatedly threatened to force a shutdown if he cannot secure money for the wall. As a candidate, he promised to force Mexico to fund the barrier.

Schumer met with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday. The Kentucky Republican proposed an appropriations bill that includes money for border security fencing, as well as what a Senate Democratic aide described as a $1 billion “slush fund” that Trump could use on his immigration policies. The aide told CNBC that Democrats would reject the deal, as Pelosi later did publicly.

A McConnell spokesman later told NBC News that the “hypothetical slush fund” would not go toward a wall.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks to the media in the White House driveway after appearing on a morning television show on December 18, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Still, Trump himself has not weighed in Tuesday on how much money he would accept. As always, a comment or tweet from the president could trample on the message administration officials try to send.

In proposing $1.6 billion in border security funding, Schumer has said it would go to building new or repairing existing fences, rather than the wall as Trump has proposed it. The White House appears to want to claim that funding as “wall” money to promote a victory.

Trump has also claimed his administration has built large portions of the wall. But Congress has only authorized money to build fencing similar to existing structures. The president has also contended that the military could build the wall — though the Pentagon has said it has no plans to do so, yet.

On Tuesday, Pelosi told reporters that “we’ll see” if negotiations with the White House make any progress. She said the wall “is not about money,” but rather “about morality.”

“It’s the wrong thing to do. It doesn’t work. It’s not effective. It’s the wrong thing to do and it’s a waste of money,” the California Democrat said, according to NBC News.

The president has already signed spending bills for five government agencies, including the massive Departments of Defense and Health and Human Services, into law. Lawmakers still have not passed spending bills for five agencies. Trump’s push for wall money as part of Department of Homeland Security funding has snagged talks to dodge a shutdown.

Schumer said Tuesday morning that he and Pelosi had not heard from the White House on two offers it made to avoid a shutdown. One includes appropriations bills for six agencies and a year-long continuing resolution to fund DHS. The other would pass a continuing resolution to keep all seven departments running.

Leaving McConnell’s office Tuesday, the New York Democrat said he had not heard a “peep” from the White House, according to NBC News.

As only about a quarter of the government would shut down this weekend, it would have only limited effects. Along with Homeland Security, the unfunded agencies are the departments of Transportation, Commerce, Interior, Agriculture, Housing and Urban Development and Justice.

While some functions like national parks would close down, some employees and law enforcement officers at those agencies would continue working without getting paid temporarily. Those would include employees such as FBI, border patrol and Transportation Security Administration agents.

WATCH: Controversial walls in history



Controversial walls in history and the US-Mexico border


Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Jacob Pramuck

Playing

Share this video…

Watch Next…

logo

News Tips

The world is fixated on the past

POLITICIANS HAVE always exploited the past. But just now, rich countries and emerging economies are experiencing an outbreak of nostalgia. Right and left, democracies and autocracies, all are harking back to the glories of yesteryear. Even as President Donald Trump vows to “Make America great again”, President Xi Jinping is using his “Chinese dream” to banish a century of humiliation and return China to its golden age. Mexico’s new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, has a mission to withstand global capitalism and restore his country’s economic sovereignty. Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the most powerful politician in Poland, wants to purge the last traces of Soviet communism to bring about a renaissance of old-fashioned Polish values.

Get our daily newsletter

Upgrade your inbox and get our Daily Dispatch and Editor’s Picks.

This orgy of reminiscence has different causes in different countries. In emerging markets past glories are often a foretaste of future triumphs. China, which has enjoyed 40 years of transformative growth, senses that it is on the threshold of something great. Under Narendra Modi, India has been celebrating its growing geopolitical heft with a Hindu-nationalist revival.

In the rich world, by contrast, nostalgia usually stems from what Sophia Gaston, of the Henry Jackson Society, calls “an omnipresent, menacing feeling of decline”. Almost two-thirds of Britons think that life used to be better. A similar share of the French do not feel at home in the present. This year’s UN World Happiness Report found that Americans are becoming less content. Large majorities in rich and developing countries believe that robots and automation will increase inequality and harm employment. A poll of 28 countries in 2017 found that over half of respondents expected their living conditions to stagnate or worsen. Only 15% of Japanese think their children will be richer than their parents.

Vaults full of research attest to how emerging-market optimism is more soundly based than rich-country pessimism. People around the world are living longer, healthier lives; fewer fall victim to war and famine; as education spreads, discrimination and prejudice are waning. Similarly, the summers were rarely as idyllic or the nation as glorious as sentiment would have it.

But to reject pessimism and nostalgia as simply inaccurate misses the point. They are powerful forces that are shaping politics. To harness them, you must first understand them.

Nostalgia serves optimists and pessimists alike as an anchor in a world being transformed. New technologies, including artificial intelligence, threaten to disrupt entire industries and to alter the relationship between the state and the citizen. After two centuries power is shifting from the West back to China. The planet is ageing faster than at any time in history. Its climate is changing. It is ever more racially and culturally mixed.

At such moments, people are drawn to nostalgia as a source of reassurance and self-esteem. Many Brexiteers hope that leaving the European Union means they will once again belong to a dynamic “global Britain”. Catalans evoke an idealised past in pursuit of a distinctive identity. Alarmed by corruption and recession, Brazilians have elected a president who harks back to the certainties of a military dictatorship they rid themselves of three decades ago. When Mr Trump boosts coal and steel, men who feared that they had been marginalised in dirty, dying industries suddenly feel as if they are worth something again.

In the rich world, nostalgia also offers a way to rebel against someone else’s idea of progress—to “take back control”. The far-right Alternative for Germany has its strongest support in the former East, where voters regret their loss of community and security. In France the gilets jaunes smash shop windows on the Champs-Elysées because they cannot make ends meet. They reject the trade-off offered by their president, Emmanuel Macron, between national prosperity and individual economic security.

This makes nostalgia dangerous. Protesters do not necessarily expect to put back the clock—they may just be seeking to slow it down. And yet such sclerosis may only aggravate the sense of decline. In addition, the self-esteem that nostalgists crave often seems to feed xenophobia. India’s Hindu-nationalist revival has seen an increase in reported hate crimes towards Muslims. In the West people on the right remember a whiter past, with fewer cultures, even as the hard left condemns the machinations of global business. It is no accident that there has been a resurgence of anti-Semitism, not least in Britain’s Labour Party under the backward-looking Jeremy Corbyn.

Because of the taint of xenophobia, progressives are quick to treat all nostalgia as prejudice, leading them to dismiss the fears of whole sections of society. That sweeping judgment is one more reason why populists have been able to exploit nostalgia so successfully.

They are having it too easy. Nostalgia can be harnessed for good. At the start of the 20th century, Europe and America were nostalgic, too, buffeted by a similar confluence of technological, geopolitical and cultural change. Then a period of conflict and social upheaval led to universal suffrage and education for all. Today’s politicians can learn from that time. They must avoid war, obviously, by preserving and enhancing the institutions that enable countries to work together. But they should also find bold ways to deal with insecurity and alienation. That will involve the state working harder for the citizen by making education available throughout people’s lives, by overhauling taxation, devolving power to cities and regions, averting climate catastrophe, and wise management of immigration.

If the past is a foreign country, let me emigrate

The nostalgists are on to something. When one way of running the world seems to be exhausted, but the next has yet to come into being, the past holds important lessons. When nothing seems to make sense, history becomes the supreme discipline. Knowing who you are and where you came from matters.

The best way to harness the past demolishes prejudice and opens horizons. A proper sense of history helps you grasp that progress depends on facing up to hard choices. Sometimes it can inspire, too. Fifty years ago Apollo 8 took off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. On December 24th it captured a photograph of Earth, a half-shrouded blue-white planet, seemingly united.

This article appeared in the Leaders section of the print edition under the headline “The uses of nostalgia”

Tuesday was a bad day for Flynn and a good day, perhaps, for Trump

Judge Emmet Sullivan’s extraordinary rebuke of Michael Flynn indicates that the former national security adviser has painful days ahead. But by suggesting to Flynn’s legal team that they ask for a sentencing delay, and then accepting that delay, Sullivan’s words might also indicate Flynn has given special counsel Robert Mueller little incriminating material on President Trump.

After all, had Flynn’s evidence provided a prosecution link to Trump or his inner circle, we might have expected Sullivan to treat the former national security more favorably.

That was most certainly not the case on Tuesday. Prior to accepting Flynn’s request for a sentencing delay, Sullivan asked prosecutors whether they had considered charging Flynn with treason. They said they had not. But the judge wasn’t stopping there. Flynn’s conduct, Sullivan said, filled him with disgust. He added, “You were an unregistered agent of a foreign country while serving as the national security adviser to the president. Arguably, this undermines everything this flag over here stands for. Arguably, you sold your country out.”

Wow. While Sullivan then backtracked on his words, the judge knows the publicity of this case and its political importance. I therefore have little doubt that he had judicial grounds to motivate his rhetoric.

Again, however, if Flynn had provided some great value to Mueller, would Sullivan have been so harsh? Perhaps he would have, but I doubt it. As pertaining to plea deals such as Flynn’s, U.S. federal prosecutions are built on a system that is designed to balance leniency in return for evidence offered. In this case, Flynn’s evidence offered is supposed to be only peripherally linked to the indictment of two of his Turkey-lobbying business partners. While Flynn’s sentencing has now been delayed until March so as to offer his greater testimonial value to the government, that was not why Mueller suggested Flynn might be given a no-prison sentence. Again, the Turkey-lobbying business is peripheral to Mueller’s investigative remit: possible Trump campaign collusion with Russia and possible obstruction of justice by Trump himself.

That brings us to the many redactions in Mueller’s sentencing report on Flynn. They now suggest that there is far more damaging material pertaining to Flynn that is waiting to come to light here. I strongly suspect that this will involve documentation of Flynn’s effort to subvert U.S. national interests and federal law in order to serve aggressive Turkish government interests: specifically, Turkey’s interest in extracting exiled Turkish cleric, Fethullah Gulen, from the U.S. But Flynn’s record of erratic behavior indicates that his Turkish antics were born of arrogance and greed rather than treasonous intent.

Yet for Trump, Tuesday at least was not a bad day. Put simply, Sullivan strongly implied that whatever Mueller had got from Flynn was not enough to justify Flynn receiving a lenient sentence. He has delayed sentencing so as to give Flynn more time to help the government in order to help himself.

Tuesday was a bad day for Flynn and a good day, perhaps, for Trump

Judge Emmet Sullivan’s extraordinary rebuke of Michael Flynn indicates that the former national security adviser has painful days ahead. But by suggesting to Flynn’s legal team that they ask for a sentencing delay, and then accepting that delay, Sullivan’s words might also indicate Flynn has given special counsel Robert Mueller little incriminating material on President Trump.

After all, had Flynn’s evidence provided a prosecution link to Trump or his inner circle, we might have expected Sullivan to treat the former national security more favorably.

That was most certainly not the case on Tuesday. Prior to accepting Flynn’s request for a sentencing delay, Sullivan asked prosecutors whether they had considered charging Flynn with treason. They said they had not. But the judge wasn’t stopping there. Flynn’s conduct, Sullivan said, filled him with disgust. He added, “You were an unregistered agent of a foreign country while serving as the national security adviser to the president. Arguably, this undermines everything this flag over here stands for. Arguably, you sold your country out.”

Wow. While Sullivan then backtracked on his words, the judge knows the publicity of this case and its political importance. I therefore have little doubt that he had judicial grounds to motivate his rhetoric.

Again, however, if Flynn had provided some great value to Mueller, would

Article source: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/tuesday-was-a-bad-day-for-mike-flynn-and-a-good-day-perhaps-for-trump

Useful Links: Swiss Watches | Watch Coupons | Coupons | Alu Foam | Security Rooms | Oldtimer | Bitcoin News

Trump Foundation agrees to dissolve under court supervision

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

‘Why has the world abandoned us?’ The tough questions faced by Washington Post correspondents in 2018

The new European data protection law requires us to inform you of the following before you use our website:

We use cookies and other technologies to customize your experience, perform analytics and deliver personalized advertising on our sites, apps and newsletters and across the Internet based on your interests. By clicking “I agree” below, you consent to the use by us and our third-party partners of cookies and data gathered from your use of our platforms. See our Privacy Policy and Third Party Partners to learn more about the use of data and your rights. You also agree to our Terms of Service.

Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2018/12/18/why-has-world-abandoned-us-tough-questions-faced-by-washington-post-correspondents/

Useful Links: Swiss Watches | Watch Coupons | Coupons | Alu Foam | Security Rooms | Oldtimer | Bitcoin News